Mobile Version

    You can use your smart phone to browse stories in the comfort of your hand. Simply browse this site on your smart phone.

    RSS Feeds

    Using an RSS Reader you can access most recent stories and other feeds posted on this network.

    SNetwork Recent Stories

Canada Commits ‘Grave Violation’ of Rights of Aboriginal Women and Girls: United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women Releases Report on Inquiry

by NationTalk on March 9, 2015153137 Views

(March 6, 2015) (Ottawa, ON) In a report released today, the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) concludes that Canada’s ongoing failure to address the extreme violence against Aboriginal women and girls constitutes a “grave violation” of their human rights.

Dawn Harvard, Interim President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, says, “On the eve of International Women’s Day, the CEDAW Committee condemns Canada for failing in its human rights commitments to Aboriginal women because it refuses to deal with the violence as ‘a serious large‑scale problem requiring a comprehensive, coordinated response’.”

After extensive examination of evidence, the CEDAW Committee concludes that Canada is violating Articles 2, 3, 5 and 14 of the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women. These articles require States parties to take all appropriate measures to eliminate discrimination against women, to modify social practices that discriminate against women, and to take into account the special problems encountered by women living in rural and remote areas.

The CEDAW Committee finds that there are ongoing police and justice system failures to respond adequately to the violence, dismissive responses to family members, lack of diligence in investigations, and lack of effective mechanisms for oversight of police practices and conduct, including the practices and conduct of the RCMP.

The Committee also finds that Canada has failed to properly take into account the root causes of the violence. It states unequivocally that the realization of economic and social rights, including the right to adequate living conditions on and off reserve, is necessary to enable Aboriginal women to escape from violence.

The United Nations CEDAW Committee oversees the implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women by the 188 countries that have ratified it. Canada ratified in 1981. Residents of states that have ratified both the Convention and its Optional Protocol can make individual complaints when their rights have been infringed or can request an inquiry into systemic violations of human rights by their governments.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) and the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA) made a request to the CEDAW Committee in 2011to inquire into the crisis of murders and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls.

“The UN CEDAW Committee has considered voluminous and detailed evidence from Canada about the steps that it is taking, but it finds them insufficient, inadequate, and uncoordinated”  ‑ says Sharon McIvor of the Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action – “so insufficient that the failure amounts to a grave violation of rights.”

“Canada told the Committee that it is ‘strongly opposed’ to the development of a national action plan,” says Shelagh Day of FAFIA. “But the Committee recommends that Canada establish a national public inquiry in order to develop an integrated national plan of action, and a coordinated mechanism for implementation and monitoring it. This is the step that is so clearly necessary now.”

“This is an extremely important report for Canada,” says Dawn Harvard of NWAC. “Canada has been told, first by the Inter‑American Commission on Human Rights, and now by the United Nations CEDAW Committee, that Canada’s failures to act violate the human rights of Aboriginal women.”

The CEDAW Committee has issued a comprehensive set of recommendations dealing with policing, victim services, access to justice, stereotyping, prostitution and trafficking, social and economic conditions and the Indian Act. It calls on Canada to implement them as a whole.

“What more does Canada need?” says Dawn Harvard of NWAC. “It is time to act now.”

 -30-

The CEDAW Inquiry report can be found here:

http://www.fafia-afai.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/CEDAW_C_OP-8_CAN_1_7643_E.pdf

Further information on the CEDAW Inquiry, including submissions to the Committee, can be found at: http://www.fafia-afai.org/en/solidarity-campaign/the-cedaw-inquiry/

Media Contacts:

Native Women’s Association of Canada:
Claudette Dumont‑Smith and Dawn Harvard: 613‑894‑0576

Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action:
Sharon McIvor 250‑378‑7479
Holly Johnson 613‑355‑5582
Shelagh Day 604‑872‑0750 or email: shelagh.day@gmail.com

BACKGROUNDER

Inquiry under Article 8 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women into Murders and Disappearances of Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada

  • The United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) came into force 3 September 1981
  • Canada ratified CEDAW on 10 December, 1981
  • The United Nations Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women came into force on 22 December 2000
  • Canada ratified the Optional Protocol to CEDAW on 18 Oct 2002
  • The Optional Protocol to CEDAW authorizes the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW Committee) to 1) receive and adjudicate complaints from individuals who allege that their rights have been violated by a State that is a party to the treaty, and 2) initiate an inquiry when it receives “reliable information indicating grave or systematic violations.”
  • Canada’s compliance with the Convention is reviewed about once every five years by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW Committee). Canada submits a report. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) also submit reports.
  • The Canadian Feminist Alliance for International Action (FAFIA), in its submission to the CEDAW Committee at the time of the review of Canada’s 6th and 7th reports in November 2008, drew attention to missing and murdered Aboriginal women in Canada.
  • The CEDAW Committee, after reviewing Canada’s compliance with its obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women in 2008, in its Concluding Observations, stated:

31. …the Committee…remains concerned that hundreds of cases involving Aboriginal women who have gone missing or been murdered in the past two decades have neither been fully investigated nor attracted priority attention, with the perpetrators remaining unpunished.

32. The Committee urges the State party to examine the reasons for the failure to investigate the cases of missing or murdered Aboriginal women and to take the necessary steps to remedy the deficiencies in the system. The Committee calls upon the State party to urgently carry out thorough investigations of the cases of Aboriginal women who have gone missing or been murdered in recent decades. It also urges the State party to carry out an analysis of those cases in order to determine whether there is a racialized pattern to the disappearances and take measures to address the problem if that is the case.

  • Canada was asked to report back on its actions on the recommendation contained in paragraph 32 in one year, and it did so in February 2010. FAFIA and the Native Women’s Association of Canada provided follow-up reports indicating that Canada had taken no adequate action.
  • On 25 August 2010, after considering the follow-up report from Canada, the CEDAW Committee wrote to Canada to state that “The Committee considers that its recommendation (regarding missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls) has not been implemented and it requests the Canadian authorities to urgently provide further information on measures undertaken to address such concerns …”. Canada supplied further information to the Committee on 8 December 2010, but was asked additional questions.
  • In January 2011, FAFIA made a formal request to the CEDAW Committee to initiate an Inquiry under Article 8 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention.
  • In September 2011, NWAC made a formal request to the CEDAW Committee to initiate an Inquiry under Article 8 of the Optional Protocol
  • In September 2011, FAFIA and NWAC submitted additional information to the Committee and requested that an Inquiry under Article 8 of the Optional Protocol be initiated because of Canada’s failure to act promptly and effectively to address the violations of the human rights of Aboriginal women and girls.
  • The CEDAW Committee decided to conduct an Inquiry into missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada in 2011.
  • Members of the CEDAW Committee came to Canada in September 2013 to investigate and meet with both government and civil society representatives in Ottawa, Winnipeg, Whitehorse, Prince George and Vancouver.

Further information about the CEDAW Inquiry and all relevant documents can be found at: http://www.fafia-afai.org/en/solidarity-campaign/the-cedaw-inquiry/.

—————————————-

Le Canada commet de « graves violations » des droits des femmes et des filles autochtones : Le Comité des Nations Unies pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes publie son rapport d’enquête

(6 mars, 2015) (Ottawa, ON)  Dans un rapport publié aujourd’hui, le Comité des Nations Unies pour l’élimination de la discrimination à l’égard des femmes (Comité de la CEDEF) conclut que le défaut continu du Canada d’agir pour contrer la violence extrême faite aux femmes et aux filles autochtones constitue une « grave violation » des droits de la personne.

Dawn Harvard, présidente intérimaire de l’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada, dit : « À la veille de la Journée internationale de la femme, le Comité de la CEDEF réprouve le Canada qui manque à ses engagements en matière de droits de la personne envers les femmes autochtones du fait qu’il refuse d’aborder la violence comme un sérieux problème de grande envergure qui nécessite une réponse exhaustive et coordonnée ».

Après un examen approfondi du dossier de la preuve, le Comité de la CEDEF conclut que le Canada viole les articles 2, 3, 5 et 14 de la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes. Ces articles exigent des États parties qu’ils prennent toutes les mesures appropriées pour éliminer la discrimination à l’égard des femmes, qu’ils modifient les pratiques sociales discriminatoires envers les femmes et qu’ils tiennent compte des problèmes particuliers qui se posent aux femmes vivant en régions rurales et éloignées.

Le Comité de la CEDEF constate le défaut continu de la police et du système judiciaire de répondre adéquatement à la violence, des réponses dédaigneuses faites aux membres de familles éprouvées, un manque de diligence dans les enquêtes et un manque de mécanismes efficaces de surveillance des pratiques et du comportement de la police, y compris les pratiques et le comportement de la GRC.

Le Comité constate également que le Canada n’a pas tenu correctement compte des causes premières de la violence. Il affirme sans équivoque que la réalisation des droits économiques et sociaux, y compris le droit à des conditions de vie convenables, dans les réserves et ailleurs, est nécessaire pour donner aux femmes autochtones le moyen d’échapper à la violence.

Le Comité de la CEDEF des Nations Unies supervise la mise en œuvre de la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes par les 188 pays signataires. Le Canada a ratifié cette convention en 1981. Les habitants des États qui ont ratifié la Convention et le Protocole facultatif qui s’y rapporte peuvent formuler des plaintes individuelles lorsque leurs droits sont transgressés; ils peuvent également demander la tenue d’une enquête sur des violations systémiques des droits de la personne commises par leur gouvernement.

L’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC) et l’Alliance canadienne féministe pour l’action internationale (FAFIA) ont demandé au Comité de la CEDEF en 2011 de faire enquête sur la crise des meurtres et des disparitions de femmes et de filles autochtones.

« Le Comité de la CEDEF des Nations Unies a pris en considération un volumineux dossier détaillé soumis par le Canada au sujet des mesures qu’il prend, mais le Comité juge ces mesures insuffisantes et inadéquates et il estime qu’elles manquent de coordination », dit Sharon McIvor, de l’Alliance canadienne féministe pour l’action internationale, qui ajoute : « insuffisantes au point d’équivaloir à une grave violation des droits. »

« Le Canada a dit au Comité qu’il est fortement opposé à l’élaboration d’un plan d’action national », dit Shelagh Day, de FAFIA. « Mais le Comité recommande au Canada d’établir une enquête publique nationale afin d’élaborer un plan d’action national intégré, ainsi qu’un mécanisme coordonné pour le mettre en œuvre et en surveiller l’exécution. Il est tellement évident que c’est l’étape qu’il faut franchir maintenant. »

« Ce rapport est extrêmement important pour le Canada », dit Dawn Harvard, de l’AFAC. « Le Canada s’est fait dire, d’abord par la Commission interaméricaine des droits de l’homme, et maintenant par le Comité de la CEDEF des Nations Unies, que son refus d’agir viole les droits de la personne des femmes autochtones. »

Le Comité de la CEDEF a formulé une série de recommandations détaillées qui portent sur le maintien de l’ordre, les services aux victimes, l’accès à la justice, les stéréotypes, la prostitution et le trafic des personnes, les conditions économiques et sociales, ainsi que la Loi sur les Indiens. Le Comité demande au Canada d’assurer la mise en œuvre de l’ensemble de ces recommandations.

« Que faut-il de plus au Canada? », dit Dawn Harvard, de l’AFAC. « Il est temps d’agir, maintenant. »

– 30 –

On peut consulter le rapport du Comité de la CEDEF http://www.fafia-afai.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/CEDAW_C_OP-8_CAN_1_7643_E.pdf

Pour obtenir plus d’information sur l’enquête du Comité de la CEDEF, y compris les soumissions présentées au Comité, voir :

http://www.fafia-afai.org/fr/campagne-de-solidarite/enquete-cedef/

Personnes-ressources :

Association des femmes autochtones du Canada :
Claudette Dumont‑Smith et Dawn Harvard : 613‑894‑0576

Alliance canadienne féministe pour l’action internationale :
Sharon McIvor 250‑378‑7479
Holly Johnson 613‑355‑5582
Shelagh Day 604‑872‑0750 ou courriel : shelagh.day@gmail.com

Fiche d’information – Enquête en vertu de l’article 8 du Protocole facultatif à la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes sur les meurtres et disparitions de femmes et de filles autochtones au Canada

  • La Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes des Nations Unies (également désignée par l’acronyme CEDEF en français et CEDAW en anglais) est entrée en vigueur le 3 septembre 1981.
  • Le Canada a ratifié la Convention le 10 décembre 1981.
  • Le Protocole facultatif à la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes des Nations Unies est entré en vigueur le 22 décembre 2000.
  • Le Canada a ratifié le Protocole facultatif à la Convention le 18 octobre 2002.
  • Le Comité sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes (Comité de la CEDEF) est autorisé par le protocole facultatif à la Convention à : 1) recevoir les plaintes d’individus qui allèguent la violation de leurs droits par un État partie à la Convention, et 2) à faire enquête lorsqu’il « est informé, par des renseignements crédibles, qu’un État partie [à la Convention] porte gravement ou systématiquement atteinte aux droits énoncés dans la Convention ».
  • La conformité du Canada à la Convention fait l’objet d’un examen à tous les cinq ans environ par le Comité de la Convention des Nations Unies sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes. Le Canada présente un rapport au Comité. Des organismes non gouvernementaux (ONG) peuvent également présenter des rapports parallèles.
  • L’Alliance canadienne féministe pour l’action internationale (AFAI), dans sa présentation au Comité de la CEDEF lors de l’examen des sixième et septième rapports du Canada en novembre 2008, a attiré l’attention sur la question des femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées au Canada.
  • Après avoir examiné le respect par le Canada de ses obligations découlant de la Convention sur l’élimination de toutes les formes de discrimination à l’égard des femmes, en 2008, le Comité de la CEDEF affirmait dans ses Observations finales que :

31. Le Comité (…) reste préoccupé par le fait qu’au cours des deux dernières décennies des centaines d’affaires de disparition ou de meurtre de femmes autochtones n’ont pas fait l’objet d’enquêtes approfondies ni d’une attention prioritaire, les coupables restant impunis.

32. Le Comité invite instamment l’État partie à examiner les raisons de l’absence d’enquêtes sur ces affaires de disparition et de meurtre de femmes autochtones et à prendre les mesures nécessaires pour remédier aux carences du système. Il exhorte l’État partie à effectuer d’urgence des enquêtes approfondies sur les affaires de disparition ou de meurtre de femmes autochtones des dernières décennies. Il l’invite instamment aussi à effectuer une analyse de ces affaires pour déterminer s’il y a « racialisation » de ces disparitions et, si c’est le cas, à prendre des mesures en conséquence.1

  • Le Comité a demandé au Canada de lui faire part dans un an des mesures prises pour donner suite à la recommandation du paragraphe 32. Le Canada a répondu en février 2010. L’AFAI et l’Association des femmes autochtones du Canada ont produit des rapports de suivi indiquant que le Canada n’avait pas pris de mesures adéquates.2
  • Le 25 août 2010, après avoir examiné le rapport de suivi du Canada, le Comité de la CEDEF a écrit au Canada que ses recommandations concernant les femmes et les filles autochtones disparues et assassinées n’avaient pas été mises en oeuvre et lui demandant de lui fournir d’urgence plus d’information sur les mesures prises pour répondre à ces préoccupations. Le Canada a fourni plus d’information au Comité le 8 décembre 2010. Le Comité a posé des questions additionnelles.
  • En janvier 2011, l’AFAC a demandé officiellement au Comité de la CEDEF de lancer une enquête en vertu de l’article 8 du protocole facultatif de la Convention.
  • En septembre 2011, l’AFAI et l’AFAC ont présenté des informations additionnelles au Comité et demandé la tenue d’une enquête en vertu de l’article 8 du protocole facultatif, parce que le défaut du Canada d’agir rapidement et efficacement pour régler problème de violation des droits de la personne des femmes et des filles autochtones.
  • Le Comité CEDAW a décidé à l’automne 2011 de mener une enquête sur la disparition et les meurtres de femmes et de filles autochtones au Canada.
  • En septembre 2013, des membres du Comité de la CEDEF sont venues au Canada pour mener une enquête et rencontrer des représentantes du gouvernement et de la société civile à Ottawa, Winnipeg, Whitehorse, Prince George and Vancouver.

Pour plus d’information sur l’enquête du Comité de la CEDEF et pour consulter les documents pertinents: http://www.fafia-afai.org/en/solidarity-campaign/the-cedaw-inquiry/

SK5

Send To Friend Email Print Story

38 Responses to “Canada Commits ‘Grave Violation’ of Rights of Aboriginal Women and Girls: United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women Releases Report on Inquiry”

  1. Pingback:ロエベ センダ

  2. Pingback:フェンディ ポーチ ペカン

  3. Pingback:プラダ トート カナパ 人気色

  4. Pingback:reebok スニーカー 取扱店

  5. Pingback:ナイキ くつ

  6. Pingback:クロムハーツ 財布 セメタリー

  7. Pingback:ラコステ ポーチ

  8. Pingback:ウブロ 腕時計 メンズ

  9. Pingback:ニューバランス インスタ

  10. Pingback:シャネル メンズ ブルー

  11. Pingback:シャネル バッグ バイマ

  12. Pingback:クロエ バッグ 新作 2013

  13. Pingback:トリーバーチ 伊勢丹新宿店

  14. Pingback:タグホイヤー 日付 合わせ方

  15. Pingback:香水 ショパール ターコイズ

  16. Pingback:ヴィトン ショルダーバッグ 人気

  17. Pingback:アディダス 靴 カントリー

  18. Pingback:ロレックス 透かしマーク

  19. Pingback:シャネル バッグ 新作 2014

  20. Pingback:グッチ soho ショルダー

  21. Pingback:トリーバーチ ケリントン トート

  22. Pingback:コーチ 返品

  23. Pingback:クロムハーツ 値上げ 2012

  24. Pingback:シャネル 雑誌広告

  25. Pingback:エルメス キーケース ベアン

  26. Pingback:ルイヴィトン 財布 メンズ レディース 違い

  27. Pingback:エルメス スカーフ シミ

  28. Pingback:エルメス スカーフ 生命の木

  29. Pingback:シャネル ネイル 新色 2015

  30. Pingback:プラダ 財布 色

  31. Pingback:バーバリー 御殿場アウトレット

  32. Pingback:chanel 財布 男

  33. Pingback:チュードル 比較

  34. Pingback:ゼニス zenith エリート ウルトラシン

  35. Pingback:ルイヴィトン ウジェニ

  36. Pingback:dormetrilopila

  37. Pingback:指輪 メンズ 人気 ブランド

  38. Pingback:Happy Rose Day 2016 Wallpapers

NationTalk Partners & Sponsors Learn More